A trip to my beloved and much-missed Ballard Farmers Market. I hate that I feel so meh about the downtown Des Moines farmers market. It’s just, it’s sort of like trying to do your shopping every week at Pike Place Market. It’s too big, there are too many people. It’s crowded and nobody is moving. I’m used to being able to meander around a small market, do a loop, decide what to buy. There is no doing a loop at the DSM market. There is no meandering. If you want regular veggies, you have to figure out who your vendors are and where they are, get in early, shop from them exclusively, and get out. I mean. I am happy that it is so successful, of course. Next summer I will have to make more of an effort to find the smaller, neighborhood markets. 

I bought some smoked salmon at the market. I had been dreaming about it for months. It did not let me down, it was so, so delicious. I took some on the Wenatchee tubing trip to share. 

Places to Drink and Work

Hey, Des Moines:

Earlier this week I was thinking about places to drink and work. As in, I’ve got some shit to do but I don’t want to drink coffee while I do it, I want to drink beer. A day or two later a friend texted me and asked for suggestions for the same thing. Our priorities are different: I want my spot to be downtown, she wants hers to be kind of quiet. Wifi is obviously a requirement as well. She had been to Mars Cafe, for example, but found it too noisy for her needs.

Places I thought of:

  • Ritual Cafe. I know they have some beers on the menu. But, they close kind of early and the wifi is not the greatest. 
  • Hub Spot on the Riverwalk, although now I can’t remember if they have wifi, as I was writing on paper when I was there. A few beers, much quieter vibe, nice view. Their hours can be strange too - sometimes closed for private events, and when I went I asked what time they close and it sounds like if business is slow they’ll close earlier than they normally do, so that’s a thing to consider.
  • Malo / Des Moines Social Club. Although Malo is a fancier restaurant, the space is big enough that I feel like it’s possible they wouldn’t mind a person camping out doing work, especially if that person orders drinks. ALSO, Malo drinks can be taken to other parts of DMSC, so one could move into the gallery/Capes area where there are outlets and more space.
  • I wondered about the Gramercy Tap? I’ve only been during Market Day, so I don’t know what the bar’s vibe is like on a weeknight. I also don’t know if they have wifi.

What other suggestions do you guys have for Places to Drink and Work in Des Moines?

warmgospel
warmgospel:

October 9
8 PM
Racquetball Court, Des Moines Social Club
Five Dollars
Jon Mueller (of Volcano Choir, Bon Iver)
I’ll admit outright that I love it when people get weird. Not “this is uncomfortable” weird, but more like seeing someone you work with outside of work for the first time and realizing that bartending or waiting tables really is just a miniscule part of what they do with their life.
Jon Mueller, largely known for his work as the drummer in Jagjaguwar supergroup, Volcano Choir, gets weird when you get him in a room alone. Chanting and earthly rhythms like spirit animal kind of stuff, predating pop music as a whole. Or perhaps postdating it, considering the recent emergence of noise music characteristics in otherwise non-experimental genres.
Regardless, Mueller’s take on things as a solo musician lie somewhere outside of documented time and convention, resulting in the kind of new ideas which seek to enhance music as a whole from its undiscovered corners teeming with qualities of the unclassifiable.
Jordan Mayland (Des Moines, IA)
If one were to compile a list of Iowa’s most prolific musicians, Jordan Mayland would appear high in the ranks. And his contribution differs greatly from project to project: leading the pack in The Thermal Detonators, crushing drums in The Wheelers, texturizing the wall of sound in Tires with synth melodies. The list goes on.
It is often said that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, but in the case of Mayland’s solo interpretation of songs since taken to full band performances, a certain quality of privacy is revealed. The simplicity of voice and piano mold together into an expression, separate from the qualities of entertainment inherent in a performance, provoking thought and demanding full attention through detail, rather than volume.
ARU (Dubuque, IA)
Dubuque’s Aural Resurrection Unit (ARU) has been turning dance music weird along the river for years, picking up the pieces of drums from last night’s rave and filtering them through enough effects to bury the individual hits under a kind of juxtaposed haze, wherein any dance floor details are lost underneath the waves of churning rhythm. A wall of texture remains, rippling like a body of water.
Skyscraper (Des Moines, IA)
“I spliced my sampler into the timeline of a world filled with religious traditions and listened to too much gritty hip-hop to keep it from sounding pretty. Then, I started having these perfect dreams about a tall, dark-haired girl named Luney, who came to represent the line I drew as a guidepost for judging both my sanity and the state of my soul. And then I stopped having the dreams and let the samples ride out toward infinity, unchanging in search of eternal youth.” –Warm Gospel
 More info here.

warmgospel:

October 9

8 PM

Racquetball Court, Des Moines Social Club

Five Dollars

Jon Mueller (of Volcano Choir, Bon Iver)

I’ll admit outright that I love it when people get weird. Not “this is uncomfortable” weird, but more like seeing someone you work with outside of work for the first time and realizing that bartending or waiting tables really is just a miniscule part of what they do with their life.

Jon Mueller, largely known for his work as the drummer in Jagjaguwar supergroup, Volcano Choir, gets weird when you get him in a room alone. Chanting and earthly rhythms like spirit animal kind of stuff, predating pop music as a whole. Or perhaps postdating it, considering the recent emergence of noise music characteristics in otherwise non-experimental genres.

Regardless, Mueller’s take on things as a solo musician lie somewhere outside of documented time and convention, resulting in the kind of new ideas which seek to enhance music as a whole from its undiscovered corners teeming with qualities of the unclassifiable.

Jordan Mayland (Des Moines, IA)

If one were to compile a list of Iowa’s most prolific musicians, Jordan Mayland would appear high in the ranks. And his contribution differs greatly from project to project: leading the pack in The Thermal Detonators, crushing drums in The Wheelers, texturizing the wall of sound in Tires with synth melodies. The list goes on.

It is often said that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, but in the case of Mayland’s solo interpretation of songs since taken to full band performances, a certain quality of privacy is revealed. The simplicity of voice and piano mold together into an expression, separate from the qualities of entertainment inherent in a performance, provoking thought and demanding full attention through detail, rather than volume.

ARU (Dubuque, IA)

Dubuque’s Aural Resurrection Unit (ARU) has been turning dance music weird along the river for years, picking up the pieces of drums from last night’s rave and filtering them through enough effects to bury the individual hits under a kind of juxtaposed haze, wherein any dance floor details are lost underneath the waves of churning rhythm. A wall of texture remains, rippling like a body of water.

Skyscraper (Des Moines, IA)

“I spliced my sampler into the timeline of a world filled with religious traditions and listened to too much gritty hip-hop to keep it from sounding pretty. Then, I started having these perfect dreams about a tall, dark-haired girl named Luney, who came to represent the line I drew as a guidepost for judging both my sanity and the state of my soul. And then I stopped having the dreams and let the samples ride out toward infinity, unchanging in search of eternal youth.” –Warm Gospel

 More info here.

artbeacondsm
artbeacondsm:

The “ART HARVEST TOUR” is a studio tour of central Iowa artists to be held annually the last weekend in Sept. Enjoy the beautiful fall weather and scenery as you visit the studios and galleries of the area’s best artists. In addition to enjoying the studios, you’ll see a much wider selection of the artists work (since it doesn’t have to all fit in a van!), with great prices and specials too.There will be about a dozen stops on the approximately 80 mile loop around the beautiful Des Moines River Valley. A few locations will be hosting multiple artists.This lets us include artists without sufficient studio space to host, as well as keeping the number of stops manageable so you can do the tour in a few hours. Other sights right on the route include the High Trestle Bridge in Madrid, the Hotel Patte in Perry, etc.

Here is a link to a downloadable pdf map and listing: MAP
Here is a link to a google map showing the basic route:  googlemap
Event Info

artbeacondsm:

The “ART HARVEST TOUR” is a studio tour of central Iowa artists to be held annually the last weekend in Sept. Enjoy the beautiful fall weather and scenery as you visit the studios and galleries of the area’s best artists. In addition to enjoying the studios, you’ll see a much wider selection of the artists work (since it doesn’t have to all fit in a van!), with great prices and specials too.

There will be about a dozen stops on the approximately 80 mile loop around the beautiful Des Moines River Valley. A few locations will be hosting multiple artists.This lets us include artists without sufficient studio space to host, as well as keeping the number of stops manageable so you can do the tour in a few hours. Other sights right on the route include the High Trestle Bridge in Madrid, the Hotel Patte in Perry, etc.
Here is a link to a downloadable pdf map and listing: MAP
Here is a link to a google map showing the basic route:  googlemap

Event Info